G-BOAC (204) British Production

Current Registration Date - 11/08/1980

Registration Status & Reason - De-registered 04/05/2004 (Permanently withdrawn from use)

Known as – Alpha Charlie or 204

Manufacturer’s Serial Number – 100-004

Production Type – Concorde Type 1 Variant 100-102

Manufacturing Number - 5102-01

Manufacturer - BRITISH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

Assembled at - BAC Filton Bristol, UK

Year Built - 1975

Aircraft Class - Fixed-Wing Landplane

Engines - 4 x Rolls-Royce Olympus 593 MK 610-14-28

Max Take-off Weight - 185070kg

Registered Owners - BRITISH AIRWAYS PLC, WATERSIDE (HBA3), PO BOX 365, HARMONDSWORTH, WEST DRAYTON, UB7 0GB

Registration history

 

  • First Registered as G-BOAC on 3rd April 1974 to the British Aircraft Corporation Ltd
     

  • 5th January 1979 aircraft re-registered as G-N81AC / N81AC by British Airways / Braniff Airways
     

  • 11th August 1980 aircraft re-registered as G-BOAC by British Airways
     

  • De-Registered – 4th May 2004 CofA / Permit – (Transport/Passenger) Suspended 16/05/2005

 

TO VISIT THIS CONCORDE IN ITS CURRENT LOCATION TODAY, CLICK ON THIS LINK

Aircraft history

British Government authority for the production of G-BOAC was given in December 1969

 

Concorde G-BOAC was initially used by the manufacturers, BAC, to complete the Certificate of airworthiness, which included such areas as air conditioning system checks and auto landing trails. Then after the completion of these tests, she was used alongside the airlines on route proving duties around the world. Alpha Charlie was mainly based in Bahrain but also flew some routes out of Singapore The aircraft was retuned to BAC in 1976 after completing 141 flights to be refurbished for airliner service.

 

Concorde G-BOAC (affectionately known as ‘Alpha Charlie’) became the second aircraft to join the UK’s Concorde fleet when she was delivered to British Airways on 13 February 1976

 

Despite the fact that G-BOAC was the second Concorde to be delivered, she is considered to be the flagship of the fleet as she carries the registration plate BOAC – which were the initials of British Overseas Airways Corporation, the airline that merged with BEA (British European Airways) to form British Airways

 

The aircraft made its first flight on 27 February 1975 and began its ‘endurance’ flying on 7 July that year taking in Bahrain, Bombay, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Melbourne, Beirut, Gander and Damascus

 

On 1 September 1975, G-BOAC became the first aircraft to make four Atlantic crossings in one day. It flew between London and Gander, Newfoundland

 

After months of discussions between the UK and US Governments, Alpha Charlie was the first Concorde in commercial service to land on US soil at Washington Dulles airport on 24 May 1976

 

On 19 December 1985, G-BOAC travelled at 1,488 mph, the highest recorded ground speed for a commercial airliner

 

To mark 10 years in service, four British Airways Concorde’s – including G-BOAC – flew in formation over the Atlantic

 

During 2011 The Heritage Concorde engineers under the leadership of Ian Mosdell, restored power to the aircraft while it was being stored at Manchester Airport, Steve de Sausmarez powered the aircraft for the first time on the 14th March and Katie John for the final time on the 26th August 2011. The aircraft hasn’t been powered since.

Click above to visit this Concorde

Aircraft Comments

Hours Flown – 22,260 hrs 11mins

Landings – 7 730 landings

Supersonic Flights – 6 761

Current Location – Retired from passenger service to public display at Manchester Airport, UK

Ground power was restored to this airframe by Heritage Concorde during “Project Flagship”

First power-up – 14th March 2011

Final power-up – 26th August 2011

During Project Flagship, all the accumulators were also recharged with nitrogen, and green hydraulic system reservoir was filled using a different type of hydraulic fluid, this was due to the lack of M2V fluid.

 

She is known as Alpha Charlie, and British Airways considers her to be the Flagship of BA and their Concorde Fleet as it carries the letters ‘BOAC’ which were also the initials of the British Overseas Airways Corporation, the forerunner, along with British European Airlines, to British Airways. G-BOAC was the aircraft chosen to launch the Washington service on the 26th of May 1976. It is the oldest Concorde in the BA fleet, although not the oldest officially owned by BA (that honour falls to G-BOAA), it is also the heaviest; mainly due to the fact that it was one of the first built and the other aircraft all benefited from the design being tweaked and the weight being reduced as production went along.

 

G-BOAC (216) Condition

 

Flagship of the British Airways Concorde fleet,

                                                                           now safely inside her new hangar at Manchester!

Concorde G-BOAC last flight was her retirement flight from Heathrow to Manchester Airport on 31st October 2003, the flight number for this flight was BA9020C. Flight number BA9020C, left Heathrow for Manchester on her final journey. On the flightdeck that day were Captain Paul Douglas, Captain Mike Bannister, Engineering Flight Officer Robert Woodcock and Engineering Flight Officer Trevor Norcutt. After 27 years in service, Alpha Charlie had flown for 22,260 hours and made 7,730 landings.

She is known as Alpha Charlie, and British Airways considers her to be the Flagship of BA and their Concorde Fleet as it carries the letters ‘BOAC’ which were also the initials of the British Overseas Airways Corporation, the forerunner, along with British European Airlines, to British Airways. G-BOAC was the aircraft chosen to launch the Washington service on the 26th of May 1976. It is the oldest Concorde in the BA fleet, although not the oldest officially owned by BA (that honour falls to G-BOAA), it is also the heaviest; mainly due to the fact that it was one of the first built and the other aircraft all benefited from the design being tweaked and the weight being reduced as production went along.

31 October 2003, my Concorde heads to Manchester. On a cold October morning, Concorde G-BOAC departed Heathrow for her last ever flight. She leapt into the air off runway 27R and roared into the distance, before finally passing into the clouds. G-BOAC. She was heading off to Manchester, for her final resting place... 

This Airframe has now been placed on view undercover within a wonderful purpose built hanger, The new building has biomass heating fuelled by willow grown on the airport site, rain water harvesting system and solar panels. The new visitor centre also includes a corporate hospitality suite, an education centre for local schools and a glass-walled visitor restaurant alongside Concorde, with views of the runways. The new Hanger which should last 25 years was opened by Willie Walsh, British Airways, the then chief executive.

This Concorde is the only British production Concorde that was in service during 2003, remains open for public tours.

The airframe shows some signs of the years on display outside as should be expected. But Ross Williamson at the museum has worked very hard to restore the paint finish to the exterior of the fuselage since it was moved inside the new hangar.

 

PICTURES OF CONCORDE G-BOAC, “Alpha Charlie”

204 carring the registration G-N81AC in TBB at Heathrow

204 carring the registration G-N81AC in TBB at Heathrow

G-BOAC taking off: Picture courtesy of BA Concorde Engineer John Dunlevy

This is Kristine Szulik's photo of G-BOAC at Manchester during the Jubilee celebrations.